Program



Location: Hamilton Public Library, Central Branch
When: Monday June 4, 2018
Registration and Breakfast: 9:00am-9:30am 
Education Sessions 9:30am - 4:30pm
                           

Lunch will be included. 

 


Time Format Topic Who
9:00-9:30 Chaos Welcome, find a spot, drink all of the coffee All
9:30-10:30 Opening Keynote: Five Years on the Road: Memories, Making, and Mischief on the Makerbus

When we launched the MakerBus, Canada’s First Mobile Makerspace, we had no idea what to expect, or how the experience would change us. Five years, and a significant shift in how we operate, has given us time to reflect. Kim Martin, one of the three MakerBus Co-Founders will share some lessons learned from making and the maker movement: including why you shouldn’t buy a bus, that you probably don’t need that 3D Printer, and how attempting to break a world record almost broke us. Kim will also introduce what the team is up to now, including her research on diversity in makerspaces, and conclude with some thoughts about the most important thing in your makerspace: the people.

Kim Martin is the Co-Founder and Chief Instigator of the MakerBus, as well as the Associate Director of The Humanities Interdisciplinary Collaboration (THINC) Lab at the University of Guelph. Her research spans diversity in makerspaces and feminist practices of making, the role of serendipity in humanities research, and tools for navigating linked data.

Kim Martin, Co-Founder and Chief Instigator, Makerbus

10:30-10:45 Break
 
 
10:45-12:00 From Consumers to Creators: A Hands-On Approach to Media and Technology 

TIFF’s digiPlaySpace is an immersive exhibition showcasing interactive installations, games, and experiences of artistic merit that explore the playful and creative side of emerging technologies. When the exhibition began, our aim was to give visitors the opportunity to experience technology that might not otherwise be available to them in a hands-on environment. Seven years later, the technology that previously felt inaccessible is ubiquitous. In order to keep up with this rapidly evolving landscape, our vision has shifted from access to empowerment. By playing with space and scale, we are arming our audiences with the tools, concepts, and ideas to look at technology not only as a product for consumption but as a means for creative expression. 

Brittney Filek-Gibson, Senior Coordinator, Youth Learning, TIFF
12:00-1:00 Lunch               
1:00-2:15 Lightning Talks  Learning to Teaching in an Hour
Darin White, Laurier Library


3D meets the 3 Rs
Justine Dainard, Wellington County Library


STEAM club - The Homeschool Edition         Richard Anderson, Vaughan Public Libraries


3D Design and Print Partnership Between Academic and Public Libraries
Michelle Goodridge, Wilfrid Laurier University


PULLing Interest Outside the Makerspace       Lina Kim, Toronto Public Library


Accessibility in the Makerspace           Stacey Lapp, FIMS Graduate Library /University of Western Ontario


           


             
2:15-3:15 How to Integrate Your Makerspace: This Isn't An Elite Space

Scientific inquiry is creating a model of the world and testing it to see how it lives up to our expectations. Design Thinking is about building and testing a model of what we expected the world wants or needs. Coding builds models of the logic behind an idea to make it work in the digital world. Children’s learning is about forming and testing models of the world in their minds and seeing where these bump up against other parts of reality. MakerSpaces are a great start, but they are separate spaces for “makers”. There needs to also be the opportunity for makerspaces to not be separate from regular classrooms and to not be just for an elite set of makers. 

Fred Cahill, Director of Education, STEAM Centre
3:15-3:30 Break    
3:30-4:15 Closing Keynote: Sensory Friendly Programming: How the Science Centre Enhanced Accessibility in Their Programs
Science should be fun for everyone. This was the guiding principle behind the launch of the Ontario Science Centre’s “Sensory-friendly Saturdays,” a new program designed specifically for children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Learn about the processes used, the new way of thinking required to develop this program stream…and hear some of the most heart-warming “a-ha” moments experienced.

Karen Hager, Director, Science Engagement, Ontario Science Centre; Lorrie Ann Smith, Director, Science Education, Ontario Science Centre

4:15 Closing Remarks & Goodbyes!    

Morning Keynote: 

Five Years on the Road: Memories, Making, and Mischief 
Kim Martin, featuring Beth Compton and Ryan Hunt

When we launched the MakerBus, Canada’s First Mobile Makerspace, we had no idea what to expect, or how the experience would change us. Five years, and a significant shift in how we operate, has given us time to reflect. Kim Martin, one of the three MakerBus Co-Founders will share some lessons learned from making and the maker movement: including why you shouldn’t buy a bus, that you probably don’t need that 3D Printer, and how attempting to break a world record almost broke us. Kim will also introduce what the team is up to now, including her research on diversity in makerspaces, and conclude with some thoughts about the most important thing in your makerspace: the people. 

Kim Martin is the Co-Founder and Chief Instigator of the MakerBus, as well as the Associate Director of The Humanities Interdisciplinary Collaboration (THINC) Lab at the University of Guelph. Her research spans diversity in makerspaces and feminist practices of making, the role of serendipity in humanities research, and tools for navigating linked data.


From Consumers to Creators: A Hands-On Approach to Media and Technology 
Brittney Filek-Gibson, Senior Coordinator, Youth Learning 

TIFF’s digiPlaySpace is an immersive exhibition showcasing interactive installations, games, and experiences of artistic merit that explore the playful and creative side of emerging technologies. When the exhibition began, our aim was to give visitors the opportunity to experience technology that might not otherwise be available to them in a hands-on environment. Seven years later, the technology that previously felt inaccessible is ubiquitous. In order to keep up with this rapidly evolving landscape, our vision has shifted from access to empowerment. By playing with space and scale, we are arming our audiences with the tools, concepts, and ideas to look at technology not only as a product for consumption but as a means for creative expression. 

Lightning Talks 
1. Learning to Teaching in an Hour - Darin White, Laurier Library
We're putting makers in the driver's seat leading workshops as quickly as possible and building a culture where this is the norm. "Did you like the intro photography/sewing/3D design workshop? Great, will you teach 5 of your friends? We'll help you." Tune in for a quick roundup of our progress and lessons learned from the first four doors-open months of the Laurier Library Makerspace.

2. 3D meets the 3 Rs - Justine Dainard, Wellington County Library 
Inspired by a rubber-band car with too much wobble, we began to design and 3D-print craft supplies which transformed our empty filament reels and scratched DVDs into exciting new things. What was previously trash became STEAM-powered treasure. These simple examples of "print the missing piece" have captured the imagination of patrons, and are good small-scale design projects for library staff to play with.

3. STEAM club - The Homeschool Edition - Richard Anderson, Vaughan Public Libraries 
When we were asked to expand our STEAM Club to local homeschool families, we expected the need to amplify this core program's maker activities and learning outcomes. We didn't anticipate the opportunities this initiative would inspire: we're now tapped into a much broader homeschool community as we consider what other ways - even beyond the maker movement - to serve our homeschoolers. Our makespaces opened this door.

4. 3D design and Print Partnership Between Academic and Public Libraries - Michelle Goodridge, Wilfrid Laurier University 
This talk will discuss a partnership program between the Brantford Public Library and Wilfrid Laurier University designed to teach our community how to do 3D design and printing. This program began as a youth program to create 3D avatar characters for roleplay games (eg. Dungeons and Dragons). This program has run for nearly two years and this is the first time we have designed a workshop targeting adults.

5. PULLing Interest Outside the Makerspace - Lina Kim, Toronto Public Library
The Pop-Up Learning Labs (PULLs) are mobile equipment kits with dedicated staff outfitted with similar kinds of hardware/software found in our Digital Innovation Hubs (makerspaces) but move to different branches each month. They fill the void in communities without a Digital Innovation Hub nearby. I'll share some of our best practices and lessons learned as we celebrate our second year.

6. Accessibility in the Makerspace - Stacey Lapp, FIMS Graduate Library/University of Western Ontario 
Through the removal of accessibility barriers and a change in language use, libraries can present their maker technology in a different, more inclusive manner that promotes the diversification of maker technology users. Diverse users create a stronger maker culture because we begin to look at technology through different lenses, promoting creativity and skill-building that reflects our communities.


How to Integrate Your Makerspace: This Isn't An Elite Space
Fred Cahill, Director of Education, STEAM Centre

Scientific inquiry is creating a model of the world and testing it to see how it lives up to our expectations. Design Thinking is about building and testing a model of what we expected the world wants or needs. Coding builds models of the logic behind an idea to make it work in the digital world. Children’s learning is about forming and testing models of the world in their minds and seeing where these bump up against other parts of reality. MakerSpaces are a great start, but they are separate spaces for “makers”. There needs to also be the opportunity for makerspaces to not be separate from regular classrooms and to not be just for an elite set of makers. 

Closing Keynote: 

Sensory Friendly Programming: How the Science Centre Enanced Accessibility in Their Programs
Karen Hager, Director, Science Engagement, Ontario Science Centre; Lorrie Ann Smith, Director, Science Education, Ontario Science Centre
Science should be fun for everyone. This was the guiding principle behind the launch of the Ontario Science Centre’s “Sensory-friendly Saturdays,” a new program designed specifically for children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Learn about the processes used, the new way of thinking required to develop this program stream…and hear some of the most heart-warming “a-ha” moments experienced.